This blog is an investigation on the question of why we find some book jackets, advertisements and posters appealing and others we find boring. Visual figures of speech can be defined as techniques, conciously applied by designers in order to attract the attention and approval of onlookers.

In grammar school, in classes on literature we all learned at some point about the nature of figures in speech. We heared about metaphors, antithesis, euphemisms and many more. Why do authors use them?
Example. We can say: ‘He coloured like a tomatoe’. Just why is it, we don’t just say bluntly: ‘He coloured red?’ This is because putting the tomatoe in makes it sound interesting. We will catch the attention of the listener because of it. It’s just that. Figures of speech are everywhere. You will notice the noticeable ones, like a Comparison or a Metaphor, but there are many more, that are so natural that you will be surprised to hear explain it is a figure of speech. We use them all day long and at on any occasion. For example, suppose you say: ‘It is really, really good.’ That a figure of speech. Is it? Yes. It is a Repetition. Why not just say: ‘It is really good’? Because ‘really, really  …’ attracts the attention. It causes an emphasis on your emotion and because the attention is guided towards the emotion, one listens.

Now designers do the same thing as authors, but with visual means. In designing for example a book jacket, we designers can’t just put the copy on and do nothing more than that: the book will not be ignored, nobody will notice it.

This blog is an investigation on the question of why we find some book jackets, advertisements and posters appealing and others we find boring. Visual figures of speech can be defined as techniques, conciously applied by designers in order to attract the attention and approval of onlookers.
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In grammar school, in classes on literature we all learned at some point about the nature of figures in speech. We heared about metaphors, antithesis, euphemisms and many more. Why do authors use them?
Example. We can say: ‘He coloured like a tomatoe’. Just why is it, we don’t just say bluntly: ‘He coloured red?’ This is because putting the tomatoe in makes it sound interesting. We will catch the attention of the listener because of it. It’s just that. Figures of speech are everywhere. You will notice the noticeable ones, like a Comparison or a Metaphor, but there are many more, that are so natural that you will be surprised to hear explain it is a figure of speech. We use them all day long and at on any occasion. For example, suppose you say: ‘It is really, really good.’ That a figure of speech. Is it? Yes. It is a Repetition. Why not just say: ‘It is really good’? Because ‘really, really  …’ attracts the attention. It causes an emphasis on your emotion and because the attention is guided towards the emotion, one listens.

Now designers do the same thing as authors, but with visual means. In designing for example a book jacket, we designers can’t just put the copy on and do nothing more than that: the book will not be ignored, nobody will notice it.